Workers Per Establishment: Structural Shifts in Manufacturing

Recently, we wrote about employment growth in manufacturing. Here, we look at manufacturing growth in terms of workers per establishment. Prior to the recession, the average number of workers per manufacturing establishment had been declining. During the recession, the decline accelerated before recovering somewhat and then plateauing at an average of about 36 workers per establishment in 2012. Most manufacturing sub-sectors (three-digit NAICS codes) followed the same general trend.

Most Secure Jobs that Need Little Training

For jobs that typically don’t need a college degree, which are the most secure? Here we take a look at five popular ones (see chart below). Each of these are “secure” in the sense that they are jobs with very low unemployment rates. In addition, each of these jobs typically do not require a college award, plus they usually don’t require extensive training.

California Wildfires and Day-to-Day Job Impacts

Last year, we posted a blog examining the effects of Hurricane Harvey on job postings and, by extension, employment. Below, we take the same approach to look at the impacts of a different natural disaster prevalent in late 2017 and early this year: the wildfires in California. Specifically, we are focusing on the Tubbs Fire, which affected parts of Napa, Sonoma, and Lake counties in Northern California during October 2017; and the Thomas Fire, which affected Ventura and Santa Barbara counties in Southern California in December 2017.

Occupational Separations: Components and Applications

For many years, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) used replacement rates to measure occupational demand due to individuals leaving their occupation. When the BLS switched from replacement rates to separation rates, it was quite a shock for many of us. On average, these rates measuring this type of labor demand more than quadrupled!