Economic Impact: National business economists foresee slowdown in U.S. growth

If you’ve ever spent time with a couple of economists, you may walk away thinking they never agree and enjoy criticizing each other’s models and assumptions. After spending a few days with over 300 economists at the National Association for Business Economics conference last week, I walked away with a different view. The possibility of recession and trade wars was a hot topic. An NABE panel predicts the nation will not see a recession in 2020, but that the real gross domestic product growth rate will slow to 1.8% — the first time since 2016 it has fallen below 2% with risks on the downside.

Economic Impact: Is the U.S. economy slowing down - are we heading toward a recession?

Next month will mark the longest U.S. economic expansion on record. But growing signs of a slowing economy — and potentially a recession — have some businesses concerned about the future. Increased uncertainty is never a good thing for businesses. If they don’t know the future demand for their products or services, then they hold off on plans to hire people or purchase more equipment. Several recession indicators bear watching.

Economic Impact: Time will tell how dangerous this simple curve is

Talk of recession has picked up again. The reason might sound complicated, but the principle is fairly basic. In financial parlance, we’re talking about the inversion of the yield curve. Here’s what that means … and how it might take a bit of time to know the consequences. The U.S. Treasury Department sells government bonds at various maturity dates — ranging from one month to 30 years — and it pays interest on that money it is borrowing. The “yield curve” simply represents the relationship between interest rates on short-term and longer-term securities.

Economic Impact: The economy is performing well but are there signs a possible recession is looming?

A shopper checks out holiday ornaments inside the Target store at 9001 Staples Mill Road in Henrico County on Nov. 19, a few days ahead of Black Friday. Over the past month, many analysts have started to talk about the possibility of a recession looming in 2019. And with good reason. All three major stock market indices finished 2018 with their worst annual performance since 2008.

Economic Impact: How much will Amazon's new second headquarters benefit Virginia?

The entire state of Virginia will benefit from Amazon’s decision to locate part of its second headquarters in Northern Virginia. Combining capital expenditures made by Amazon in 2030 when it reaches full capacity, along with the headquarters’ operations, the total economic impact is estimated to be $14.2 billion in Virginia, supporting 59,308 jobs, according to a new study by Chmura Economics & Analytics commissioned by the Virginia Chamber Foundation that looked into the economic impact of Amazon’s decision.